Tag Archives: environment

Senn. More than a film.

You may never have heard of Senn. It’s a film not out of Hollywood – and that’s a good thing, because I don’t think Hollywood will ever make something of such quality and depth.

Do as you’re instructed.

On my writer’s blog I’ve already paid some attention to Senn in regards to the film and the language that was designed for it. This post will focus on something else.

Senn is the name of a person on the planet Pyom. Pyom is a destroyed planet. The people of Pyom as a destroyed people. Oh, they live, walk and talk but their life isn’t what it used to be. (You may have gathered that Senn is a science fiction film. Otherwise now you know.)

Looking at Senn I saw lots of similarities of what’s going on on our own planet, and despite everything that’s going on, there is still that human touch which can remain alive. It shows the strength of people. Senn has touched me deeply.

Senn is not for science fiction lovers who are into space battles, Cylons, Klingons and gory, ooze-dripping aliens that rip people apart. Senn goes deep, very deep. If you feel you can handle that, if you think you can having your own mind ‘ripped apart’ (in a way that is how it felt to me after seeing it the first time) then please have a look at Senn. Otherwise go back to the Cylons.

You can find the film for sale (DVD, Bluray, digital download, etc.) at the Reelhouse. If you want to learn more about Senn, visit Sennition, the website that will tell you lots and lots about it.

Natural cleaning products

Original post found at Homesteadsurvivalist.com.

3 Natural Cleaning Products That Will Clean Your Entire Home

 BY  

These days, there are chemical substances in just about anything. And those chemicals can certainly be very harming, to our surroundings AND to our health. Natural substances for cleaning your house are certainly essential if you have animals or kids. You can also spend less too! Seems too excellent to be real?
Baking Soda
Baking soda is a superb deodorizer. That’s why they use it in our freezers and refrigerators. Also you have to know that it’s a natural abrasive and functions simply like those brand name cleaners? Excellent for sinks, bathrooms and tubs. Just spread and use with the sponge that’s all!

Hydrogen Peroxide
This cheap small gem is superb it is a natural anti-bacterial, anti-fungal and an anti-viral, which makes it exceptional for cleansing. Especially on kitchen counter tops in floors and in the bathroom (mildew, sinks, toilets). It presently is offered in a perfect bottle. Just purchase an inexpensive spray top that works. While you spray it on, remember to let it sit for a short time to be able for it to remove the microbes. If you are using the THIRTY-FIVE per cent grade hydrogen peroxide, in that case it’s preferred to decrease it, or just use the 3% you can get it in your regional shops.

Vinegar
Plain white vinegar is an excellent disinfectant. You can use a half and mix it with water, put it inside a spray bottle and start using it in many different places, also it’s particularly good on desks and for use on soap scum. Be sure you use it diluted, as vinegar is acidic and may be too hard on some types of surface. If you’re not so hot on the aroma of vinegar, you can put a squeeze of lemon juice or utilise lemon oil. An extra benefit of white vinegar is as a vegetable clean. Put half a cup in a sink full of water and throw in all those fresh vegetables.

to get rid of germs on your home sponges, make sure they are damp and set them in the microwave for TEN to FIFTEEN seconds. It destroys all microorganisms that can be hiding. Just be smart taking out them, they’ll be very hot

All of these items can easy get, quick to use and very cheap. Choosing all healthy cleaners is the painless option for our family member’s health and our surroundings.

Change we can believe in

From DynamicSpiral:

So, by now you’ve probably heard that we’ve recently crossed a dubious milestone: Earth’s carbon dioxide level has reached 400ppm. That’s the highest it’s been since we started taking measurements—and, as far as we can tell, the last time it was that high, there weren’t any people around to talk about it.

Well, okay, that’s not entirely true. There were people, but they looked more like this:

Image of female Australopithecus
San Diego Museum of Man

As you might have grasped from the NatGeo article, this is…kind of a big deal. Right about this point, the folks who’ve been sounding the alarm on climate change for years might be about ready to tear their hair out. Why aren’t we doing more about it? Why aren’t we doing absolutely everything in our power to try to reverse the damage we humans are doing to the climate?

The short answer—the easy answer—is that there are too many climate-change deniers. And while that’s definitely true, there’s a bigger ideological issue here.

As you may have heard, we have a bit of a problem here in the U.S. involving the intersection of science and religion. These two have some trouble getting along, sometimes. For reasons that I’ll leave to the religion scholars, our country has become a stronghold for a particularly virulent strain of fingers-in-ears, head-in-sand Biblical literalism that is so anti-science it’s frankly terrifying. You may be familiar with the anti-evolution, Young Earth Creationist nonsense that gets spouted by these folks, but there’s another branch of Christian thought that isn’t anti-science so much as anti-Earth.

At a recent evangelical Christian conference, Seattle pastor Mark Driscoll is reported to have said during a talk, ”I know who made the environment. He’s coming back and he’s going to burn it all up. So yes, I drive an SUV.” (You can see liberal Christian publication Sojourner‘s theologically alarmed response here).

Driscoll also made some comments linking SUVs and his concept of masculinity that I’ll leave to his psychoanalyst to unpack—but, for now, back to the topic at hand. Driscoll’s comment, referring to the “End Times” of Biblical prophecy, basically conveys that he sees no point in exerting any effort to protect the environment because it’s all going to end in a fiery cataclysm, anyway.

Just like the good Lord intended.

There is a strain of Christian belief that views the world as fundamentally flawed, “fallen” along with our mythical garden-going progenitors who succumbed to the temptations of forbidden fruit. From within this mindset, the world is inherently corrupt, and slotted for destruction. It’s not worth saving. Which might be why believers in the End Times are less likely to believe we should take action to avert climate change.

Especially if you don’t believe the end is far off. I mean, all those climate-disaster-scenarioweather-pornos films that Hollywood’s cranked out over the years make it look like climate change would kind of suck. But if you’re planning on getting Raptured out of here before ravening wolves take to eating people in Central Park (or whatever happened in that one movie), then what do you care what happens to this planet before it collapses into an unholy hot mess?

Do you remember way back a year ago, when folks were freaking out over the purported end of the Mayan calendar, and a Reuters poll found that 22% of Americans think the world will end in our lifetime? At least 1 in 5 people in this country believes the material universe is currently circling the drain, and that we—as in, the people alive right now—will personally witness its final lap around the cosmic toilet bowl.

When you look at it from their perspective, what’s a few miles per gallon in the not-so-long run?

But this worldview doesn’t just make people indifferent to environmentalism; it is, by logical extension, fundamentally anti-environment.

Christians of this stripe are in the world, not of it. This wicked world belongs to the unwashed masses of unsaved souls who are doomed along with it, and to expend any effort trying to preserve what God has earmarked for righteous destruction is an exercise in both futility and borderline-heretical arrogance. From the perspective of someone who adheres to this belief system, it might even be a sign of one’s faith to actively oppose any perceived pro-environmental causes.

For example: In a recent study, researchers found that self-identified conservatives were significantly less likely to buy an energy-efficient lightbulb if its packaging included a pro-environmental sticker than if it didn’t. Pitching it as something that would save them money on their electricity bill was fine; but as soon as you said the Evil E Word, conservatives checked out.

“He who is not with me is against me,” as they say.

America. Your rain are belong to us.

Yes, dear Americans, you saw that correctly. Your rain is not yours.

Via NaturalNews: Many of the freedoms we enjoy here in the U.S. are quickly eroding as the nation transforms from the land of the free into the land of the enslaved, but what I’m about to share with you takes the assault on our freedoms to a whole new level. You may not be aware of this, but many Western states, including Utah, Washington and Colorado, have long outlawed individuals from collecting rainwater on their own properties because, according to officials, that rain belongs to someone else.

As bizarre as it sounds, laws restricting property owners from “diverting” water that falls on their own homes and land have been on the books for quite some time in many Western states. Only recently, as droughts and renewed interest in water conservation methods have become more common, have individuals and business owners started butting heads with law enforcement over the practice of collecting rainwater for personal use.

Check out this YouTube video of a news report out of Salt Lake City, Utah, about the issue. It’s illegal in Utah to divert rainwater without a valid water right, and Mark Miller of Mark Miller Toyota, found this out the hard way.

After constructing a large rainwater collection system at his new dealership to use for washing new cars, Miller found out that the project was actually an “unlawful diversion of rainwater.” Even though it makes logical conservation sense to collect rainwater for this type of use since rain is scarce in Utah, it’s still considered a violation of water rights which apparently belong exclusively to Utah’s various government bodies.

“Utah’s the second driest state in the nation. Our laws probably ought to catch up with that,” explained Miller in response to the state’s ridiculous rainwater collection ban.

(Follow the link to NaturalNews for the whole article.)